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Patient Education

If your hips or knees are damaged due to arthritis, injury or overuse, joint replacement may be an option to get you back on your feet. The specialized joint replacement program offers patients and family members a new approach for joint replacement.

Click below to learn more about your joint issue and treatment options:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a total knee replacement?

  • A total knee replacement is really a bone and cartilage replacement with an artificial surface. The knee itself is not replaced, as is commonly thought, but rather an implant is inserted on the bone ends. This is done with a metal alloy on the femur and plastic spacer on the tibia and patella (kneecap). This creates a new, smooth cushion and a functioning joint that can reduce or eliminate pain.

What are the results of total knee replacement?

  • Results will vary depending on the quality of the surrounding tissue, the severity of the arthritis at the time of surgery, the patient’s activity level, and the patient’s adherence to the doctor’s orders.

What is a total hip replacement?

  • A total hip replacement is an operation that removes the arthritic ball of the upper femur (thighbone) as well as damaged bone and cartilage from the hip socket. The ball is replaced with a metal ball that is fixed solidly inside the femur. The socket is replaced with a plastic or metal liner that is usually fixed inside a metal shell to create a smoothly functioning joint.

What are the results of total hip replacement?

  • Results will vary depending on the quality of the surrounding tissue, the severity of the arthritis at the time of surgery, the patient’s activity level, and the patient’s adherence to the doctor’s orders.

How long will I be in the hospital?

  • Most joint replacement patients will be hospitalized for 2–3 days after surgery. There are several goals that must be achieved before discharge.

Do I need to be put to sleep for this surgery?

  • You may have a general anesthetic, which most people call “being put to sleep.” Some patients prefer to have a spinal or epidural anesthetic, which numbs the legs only and does not require you to be asleep. The choice is between you, your surgeon, and the anesthesiologist. For more information, read “Anesthesia” in your GuideBook appendix.

Will I need physical therapy when I go home?

  • Yes, you will have outpatient or in-home physical therapy. Patients are encouraged to utilize outpatient physical therapy. The Joint Care Coordinator will help you arrange for an outpatient physical therapy appointment. If you need home physical therapy, we will arrange for a physical therapist to provide therapy at your home. Following this, you may go to an outpatient facility two to three times a week to assist in your rehabilitation. The length of time required for this type of therapy varies with each patient.